One interesting fact you would notice are the arrays of mirrors around the pipe organ, this was done since the organ player sits with his back to the congregation thus he would not be able to see the choir master or the congregation. So with the help of mirrors, he could see the reflection and get the cue to start playing when necessary.
This pipe organ was manufactured by William Hill & Son & Norman & Beard Ltd. in England. This company was famous for manufacturing of pipe organs for movie theaters since the silent era movies required some live music to be accompanied along with the projection. Some of their famous work included the Christie in Paris and Odeon Marble Arch in London.
The organ has a console to its right and left, a combination of these stops various different tones and one needs to know the correct combination to produce a rich sound. An organ player needs to use his hands and feet to control the sound. The sound is basically produced by wind coming out of pipes of various sizes. The pitch varies depending on the length and thickness of the pipes and the keyboard along with the footboard controls the air passing through these pipes. The wind is generated by a motor which runs the bellow to generate the wind pressure. Due to this pipe organs can have a sustained sound unlike that of a piano.